Introducing WordPress static blog generator

Over the years I've read a fair number of blogs some of which suddenly disappeared which saddens me because those were valuable resources. I think many geeks swear on self-hosting their blog because of the advanced customizability and control over every single aspect of their blog. I cannot blame them because I'm one of them.

The problem is that this way your blog isn't very resilient. What happens if you get hit by a train? That's right, your bank account will eventually get depleted and your hosting provider will shut down your server, making your blog vanish. You may say that I'm being absurd talking about death but if you consider your blog your legacy just as I do then you should also be concerned.

After all this mumbo-jumbo let me introduce you WordPress static blog generator. According to my knowledge this is pretty much the most convenient way to back up your WordPress posts, pages and comments as static HTML pages which you can easily browse and push to GitHub Pages, preserving your blog for eternity.

dumbsvnreview 0.4 released

I could simply name this release as "syntax highlighting coolness" which was really simple to implement on my part because I just had to provide Meld the correct file extensions to figure out the file format. Apart from that, I've worked around an svn bug that provided many redundant parameters to the diff utility.

If you upgrade to this version, please make sure that you update your /etc/sudoers to contain the meld-wrapper script instead of meld.

Go for it!

Stick your file to a specific path with stickfile

Update (2011-04-22): Zach let me know in the meantime that there's a much easier way to implement stickfile in BASH:

Moral of the story: I should have searched for inotify command line which would lead me to inotify-tools which contains inotifywait.

And now to the original post:

My employer uses SonicWALL NetExtender for his VPN needs. Saying that I'm not a fan of IPsec would be definitely an understatement, but my major problem is that NetExtender overwrites my resolv.conf upon every connection which screws the hostname resolution on my LAN from my laptop. chmoding or chowning resolv.conf doesn't help because it gets re-chowned and re-chmoded by NetExtender.

I was thinking about overwriting resolv.conf on a regular basis from a script but it seemed rather inelegant. But how should I do it otherwise? With inotify, of course.

Here's the script I've written which you should save as "stickfile" to a directory that is featured in your $PATH.

After I created a valid resolv.conf and saved it as /etc/resolv.conf.orig I only had to execute the following as root before starting up NetExtender:

stickfile /etc/resolv.conf.orig /etc/resolv.conf